TRAVELING EXHIBITS

Traveling exhibits organized by the Museum of Russian Icons are available for loan. Please contact Registrar, Laura Garrity-Arquitt for information on scheduling and fees, and for complete object lists, by calling 978.598.5000 x116 or by emailing lgarrity(at)museumofrussianicons.org.

Mother of God Three-Handed | C.1890

WINDOWS TO HEAVEN: TREASURES FROM THE MUSEUM OF RUSSIAN ICONS

This traveling exhibition features more than 60 Russian Icons from our prestigious collection. Dating from the 16th Century to the present, they include icons of St. Nicholas and St. George, Old Testament scenes, pictorial themes centered on the life of Jesus, and images of the Mother of God. Materials include digital interpretive material, educational materials (docent guides, ideas for in-gallery activities, etc.), and hi-res images of a selection of the pieces. Click here for a printable flyer.

TOYS, TRINKETS, & TREASURES

A collection of up to 300 nesting dolls from Russia (USSR), Poland, Japan, Ukraine, and other countries. The exhibit explores the history of these marvelous toys and how they fit in with the recent history of Russia as well as international trade and cultural influence. It includes digital interpretive material, educational materials (docent guides, ideas for in-gallery activities, etc.), and hi-res images of a selection of pieces. Click here for a printable flyer.

RUSHNYKY: SACRED UKRAINIAN TEXTILES

This exhibition of 160 Rushnyky and related artifacts celebrates and explores Ukrainian culture through one of its most ancient and valued traditions. Rushnyky are ornately embroidered woven textiles that function at the core of many life-cycle ceremonies and rituals of the Ukrainian people. Capturing the cultural and ancestral memory of the region, the textiles play an important role during major ritual events in the life of Ukrainians, such as christenings, funerals, and especially weddings. Icons hung in homes are usually draped with a rushnyky; and they are also used during certain seasonal and religious holidays. Click here for a printable flyer.

CORNCOBS TO COSMONAUTS: REDEFINING THE HOLIDAYS IN THE SOVIET ERA

Following the Russian Revolution in 1917, the anti-religion Bolsheviks discouraged Christmas and New Year celebrations in the U.S.S.R. since the gift giving and extravagance that accompanied the holidays came to symbolize the greed and excess of the aristocracy and bourgeois classes. The tradition of celebrating Novy God (New Year) re-appeared in 1935 as a secular holiday that would symbolize Soviet children’s prosperity and happiness.

This exhibition of more than 150 Soviet-era ornaments, together with holiday toys, books, and cards showcase a variety of non-religious objects that were important to both the average Russian citizen and the Soviet state. These include folk heroes and cartoon characters, funny clowns and chubby babies, state emblems and objects that celebrate the productivity of farms and factories. Click here for a printable flyer.